Fill  was an ephemeral, site-specific project I did in Tucson, AZ in 2018. I took 10 brick-shaped ice cubes to a small construction site near my house, with no plan in mind but to use the objects as a way to respond to the space. I initially filled in gaps within the wall where bricks had fallen out, temporarily filling in the voids within the brickwork, as well as the bottom half of a small hole in the wall for a window. In addition to filling in the wall I also used the ice as a way to extend it, lining them up along the top ledge and stacking them on the ground, mimicking the patterns within the brickwork. The project overall was a series of ephemeral forms that responded to elements within an ephemeral space. Construction is temporary; the space will either be demolished or built into an enclosed area, no longer granting us access to see both the inside and outside of the building at the same time, except maybe through a window. After about two hours the ice bricks had completely disappeared, leaving only a damp area on the ground to prove that they ever existed.

Fill was an ephemeral, site-specific project I did in Tucson, AZ in 2018. I took 10 brick-shaped ice cubes to a small construction site near my house, with no plan in mind but to use the objects as a way to respond to the space. I initially filled in gaps within the wall where bricks had fallen out, temporarily filling in the voids within the brickwork, as well as the bottom half of a small hole in the wall for a window. In addition to filling in the wall I also used the ice as a way to extend it, lining them up along the top ledge and stacking them on the ground, mimicking the patterns within the brickwork. The project overall was a series of ephemeral forms that responded to elements within an ephemeral space. Construction is temporary; the space will either be demolished or built into an enclosed area, no longer granting us access to see both the inside and outside of the building at the same time, except maybe through a window. After about two hours the ice bricks had completely disappeared, leaving only a damp area on the ground to prove that they ever existed.

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  Fill  was an ephemeral, site-specific project I did in Tucson, AZ in 2018. I took 10 brick-shaped ice cubes to a small construction site near my house, with no plan in mind but to use the objects as a way to respond to the space. I initially filled in gaps within the wall where bricks had fallen out, temporarily filling in the voids within the brickwork, as well as the bottom half of a small hole in the wall for a window. In addition to filling in the wall I also used the ice as a way to extend it, lining them up along the top ledge and stacking them on the ground, mimicking the patterns within the brickwork. The project overall was a series of ephemeral forms that responded to elements within an ephemeral space. Construction is temporary; the space will either be demolished or built into an enclosed area, no longer granting us access to see both the inside and outside of the building at the same time, except maybe through a window. After about two hours the ice bricks had completely disappeared, leaving only a damp area on the ground to prove that they ever existed.
IceBricks_13.jpg
IceBricks_1.jpg
IceBricks_2.jpg
IceBricks_4.jpg
IceBricks_5.jpg
IceBricks_6.jpg
IceBricks_7.jpg
IceBricks_8.jpg
IceBricks_10.jpg
IceBricks_9.jpg
IceBricks_14.jpg
IceBricks_15.jpg
IceBricks_16.jpg
IceBricks_17.jpg
IceBricks_18.jpg
IceBricks_19.jpg
IceBricks_20.jpg
IceBricks_21.jpg

Fill was an ephemeral, site-specific project I did in Tucson, AZ in 2018. I took 10 brick-shaped ice cubes to a small construction site near my house, with no plan in mind but to use the objects as a way to respond to the space. I initially filled in gaps within the wall where bricks had fallen out, temporarily filling in the voids within the brickwork, as well as the bottom half of a small hole in the wall for a window. In addition to filling in the wall I also used the ice as a way to extend it, lining them up along the top ledge and stacking them on the ground, mimicking the patterns within the brickwork. The project overall was a series of ephemeral forms that responded to elements within an ephemeral space. Construction is temporary; the space will either be demolished or built into an enclosed area, no longer granting us access to see both the inside and outside of the building at the same time, except maybe through a window. After about two hours the ice bricks had completely disappeared, leaving only a damp area on the ground to prove that they ever existed.

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