the Backdrop,  an installation exhibited at the University of Arizona Graduate and Alumni Gallery in January 2019, offers a surreal space composed of interior and exterior elements, drawing participants’ attention to the various ways elements can be organized in a given space to achieve a sense of balance. Here, the colors, textures, materials, and shapes are chosen in response to the question: what is a backdrop? In other words, what is behind everything else, or what is the furthest thing we can perceive? Both breaking down the meaning of the word as well as how a backdrop functions in space, both in interiors and exteriors, I began to expand on these questions. What is consistently, inevitably behind everything else? How does the presence of the background inform the foreground? During the monsoon season this year, I began to tally all the materials and patterns around me on my daily walks with my dog. Looming shadows, brickwork, and the mutability of cloud formations became striking markers of dimensionality. Inside, these things are layered and framed within windows and doorways. Both cloudy textures and architectural shapes come together in two and three dimensions. In this work, false dimensions and shadows create a sense of movement within the space, taking elements often thought of as static and playing with them.

the Backdrop, an installation exhibited at the University of Arizona Graduate and Alumni Gallery in January 2019, offers a surreal space composed of interior and exterior elements, drawing participants’ attention to the various ways elements can be organized in a given space to achieve a sense of balance. Here, the colors, textures, materials, and shapes are chosen in response to the question: what is a backdrop? In other words, what is behind everything else, or what is the furthest thing we can perceive? Both breaking down the meaning of the word as well as how a backdrop functions in space, both in interiors and exteriors, I began to expand on these questions. What is consistently, inevitably behind everything else? How does the presence of the background inform the foreground? During the monsoon season this year, I began to tally all the materials and patterns around me on my daily walks with my dog. Looming shadows, brickwork, and the mutability of cloud formations became striking markers of dimensionality. Inside, these things are layered and framed within windows and doorways. Both cloudy textures and architectural shapes come together in two and three dimensions. In this work, false dimensions and shadows create a sense of movement within the space, taking elements often thought of as static and playing with them.

 In order to highlight certain uncanny or surreal elements in the space, I photographed the work with people in it. Activated in this new light, the space became similar to a set and its props, directly questioning the ways in which we both shape and are shaped by the space.

In order to highlight certain uncanny or surreal elements in the space, I photographed the work with people in it. Activated in this new light, the space became similar to a set and its props, directly questioning the ways in which we both shape and are shaped by the space.

_MG_0126.jpg
_MG_0101.jpg
Galen1.jpg
Leveling
Leveling

2019, aluminum, rubber ball, plexiglass, and latex paint

KW_9.jpg
KW_10.jpg
Reverse
Reverse

2019, aluminum frame, latex paint, vinyl, and mirrored window film

Reverse (detail)
Reverse (detail)

2019

Propping
Propping

2019, wood, faux mink, aluminum, stainless steel, bricks, and rubber ball

Propping (detail)
Propping (detail)

2019

LayingDown_closeup_5MB_ShortsEdit.jpg
Volume (corner installation)
Volume (corner installation)

2019, bricks, latex paint, and faux mink

Volume (detail)
Volume (detail)

2019

Volume (detail)
Volume (detail)

2019

Volume (detail)
Volume (detail)

2019

Bend
Bend

2019, foam and faux mink

Slow Contrast
Slow Contrast

2019, wood, faux mink, stainless steel, and aluminum

Slow Contrast (detail)
Slow Contrast (detail)

2019

Slow Contrast (detail)
Slow Contrast (detail)

2019

Ghost Image
Ghost Image

2018, projector screens, aluminum frames, color-shifting vinyl on aluminum, and latex paint on wall

Overlap
Overlap

2018, colored pencil and marker on paper

Escalate
Escalate

2019, oil on canvas and latex paint on wall

ShowShot_1.jpg
Drift
Drift

2019, steel, frosted vinyl, and dichroic window film

Drift (detail)
Drift (detail)

2019

Drift (detail)
Drift (detail)

2019

Interval (with cubes)
Interval (with cubes)

2018, aluminum, color-shifting vinyl, dichroic window film, and stainless steel

Interval (empty)
Interval (empty)

2018

Interval (empty)
Interval (empty)

2018

Condensed Moon
Condensed Moon

2018, projector screen, color-shifting vinyl, aluminum, and latex paint

Condensed Moon
Condensed Moon

2018

Escalate no. 1
Escalate no. 1

2018, marker and colored pencil on paper

KW_4.jpg
CornerWindowInstallation.jpg
KW_2.jpg
FrameRainbow1.jpg
FrameRainbow2.jpg
Crest
Crest

2018, metal, spray paint, color-shifting vinyl on mirror, and magnets

Crest
Crest

2018, metal, spray paint, color-shifting vinyl on mirror, and magnets

Crest
Crest

2018, metal, spray paint, color-shifting vinyl on mirror, and magnets

Crest
Crest

2018, metal, spray paint, color-shifting vinyl on mirror, and magnets

Constant
Constant

2018, sheet metal, color-shifting vinyl on mirror, and magnets

Constant (detail)
Constant (detail)

2018, sheet metal, color-shifting vinyl on mirror, and magnets

Rift
Rift

2018, metal, color-shifting vinyl on mirror, and magnets

Rift
Rift

2018, metal, color-shifting vinyl on mirror, and magnets

  the Backdrop,  an installation exhibited at the University of Arizona Graduate and Alumni Gallery in January 2019, offers a surreal space composed of interior and exterior elements, drawing participants’ attention to the various ways elements can be organized in a given space to achieve a sense of balance. Here, the colors, textures, materials, and shapes are chosen in response to the question: what is a backdrop? In other words, what is behind everything else, or what is the furthest thing we can perceive? Both breaking down the meaning of the word as well as how a backdrop functions in space, both in interiors and exteriors, I began to expand on these questions. What is consistently, inevitably behind everything else? How does the presence of the background inform the foreground? During the monsoon season this year, I began to tally all the materials and patterns around me on my daily walks with my dog. Looming shadows, brickwork, and the mutability of cloud formations became striking markers of dimensionality. Inside, these things are layered and framed within windows and doorways. Both cloudy textures and architectural shapes come together in two and three dimensions. In this work, false dimensions and shadows create a sense of movement within the space, taking elements often thought of as static and playing with them.
 In order to highlight certain uncanny or surreal elements in the space, I photographed the work with people in it. Activated in this new light, the space became similar to a set and its props, directly questioning the ways in which we both shape and are shaped by the space.
_MG_0126.jpg
_MG_0101.jpg
Galen1.jpg
Leveling
KW_9.jpg
KW_10.jpg
Reverse
Reverse (detail)
Propping
Propping (detail)
LayingDown_closeup_5MB_ShortsEdit.jpg
Volume (corner installation)
Volume (detail)
Volume (detail)
Volume (detail)
Bend
Slow Contrast
Slow Contrast (detail)
Slow Contrast (detail)
Ghost Image
Overlap
Escalate
ShowShot_1.jpg
Drift
Drift (detail)
Drift (detail)
Interval (with cubes)
Interval (empty)
Interval (empty)
Condensed Moon
Condensed Moon
Escalate no. 1
KW_4.jpg
CornerWindowInstallation.jpg
KW_2.jpg
FrameRainbow1.jpg
FrameRainbow2.jpg
Crest
Crest
Crest
Crest
Constant
Constant (detail)
Rift
Rift

the Backdrop, an installation exhibited at the University of Arizona Graduate and Alumni Gallery in January 2019, offers a surreal space composed of interior and exterior elements, drawing participants’ attention to the various ways elements can be organized in a given space to achieve a sense of balance. Here, the colors, textures, materials, and shapes are chosen in response to the question: what is a backdrop? In other words, what is behind everything else, or what is the furthest thing we can perceive? Both breaking down the meaning of the word as well as how a backdrop functions in space, both in interiors and exteriors, I began to expand on these questions. What is consistently, inevitably behind everything else? How does the presence of the background inform the foreground? During the monsoon season this year, I began to tally all the materials and patterns around me on my daily walks with my dog. Looming shadows, brickwork, and the mutability of cloud formations became striking markers of dimensionality. Inside, these things are layered and framed within windows and doorways. Both cloudy textures and architectural shapes come together in two and three dimensions. In this work, false dimensions and shadows create a sense of movement within the space, taking elements often thought of as static and playing with them.

In order to highlight certain uncanny or surreal elements in the space, I photographed the work with people in it. Activated in this new light, the space became similar to a set and its props, directly questioning the ways in which we both shape and are shaped by the space.

Leveling

2019, aluminum, rubber ball, plexiglass, and latex paint

Reverse

2019, aluminum frame, latex paint, vinyl, and mirrored window film

Reverse (detail)

2019

Propping

2019, wood, faux mink, aluminum, stainless steel, bricks, and rubber ball

Propping (detail)

2019

Volume (corner installation)

2019, bricks, latex paint, and faux mink

Volume (detail)

2019

Volume (detail)

2019

Volume (detail)

2019

Bend

2019, foam and faux mink

Slow Contrast

2019, wood, faux mink, stainless steel, and aluminum

Slow Contrast (detail)

2019

Slow Contrast (detail)

2019

Ghost Image

2018, projector screens, aluminum frames, color-shifting vinyl on aluminum, and latex paint on wall

Overlap

2018, colored pencil and marker on paper

Escalate

2019, oil on canvas and latex paint on wall

Drift

2019, steel, frosted vinyl, and dichroic window film

Drift (detail)

2019

Drift (detail)

2019

Interval (with cubes)

2018, aluminum, color-shifting vinyl, dichroic window film, and stainless steel

Interval (empty)

2018

Interval (empty)

2018

Condensed Moon

2018, projector screen, color-shifting vinyl, aluminum, and latex paint

Condensed Moon

2018

Escalate no. 1

2018, marker and colored pencil on paper

Crest

2018, metal, spray paint, color-shifting vinyl on mirror, and magnets

Crest

2018, metal, spray paint, color-shifting vinyl on mirror, and magnets

Crest

2018, metal, spray paint, color-shifting vinyl on mirror, and magnets

Crest

2018, metal, spray paint, color-shifting vinyl on mirror, and magnets

Constant

2018, sheet metal, color-shifting vinyl on mirror, and magnets

Constant (detail)

2018, sheet metal, color-shifting vinyl on mirror, and magnets

Rift

2018, metal, color-shifting vinyl on mirror, and magnets

Rift

2018, metal, color-shifting vinyl on mirror, and magnets

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